They say horoscopes give you clues about your fortune, but now new American research suggests that your birth month could provide you with warning signs for certain disease risks. According to a study by the Columbia University, your birth month and your health are interrelated. The study looked at 55 diseases, ranging from asthma to heart disease to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. This was done to see if there was indeed a connection with the patients’ birth month. So what did the study actually discover?

The Result of the Study

Based on the findings, those who were born on the month of October are most likely to have some health complications, while those who were born in May have the lowest risk for certain diseases. The researchers investigated over 1,600 diseases plus more than 1.7 million patients in New York who were treated from 1985 to 2013. According to what they have discovered, babies born on July and October are most likely to have asthma. On the other hand, those who were born on November have the highest tendency to have ADHD perhaps due to being relatively immature compared with the other children in school.

Meanwhile, March babies are more likely to have diseases related to the heart. This could confuse others who may know about the study conducted in Denmark since it was discovered there that people born in May and August are more likely to have heart disease. However, researchers conclude this is because of sunlight levels, which New York and Denmark don’t share in intensity.

As for the average life span for every birth month, it is discovered that those who were born in the first half of the year – meaning January to June – tend to live shorter than those who were born in the second half of the year.

There’s No Reason to Panic

While the study may have invoked fear in adults and those who intend to have children, the researchers wanted to assure everyone that the discovery is not something to be afraid of. In fact, their main goal is to provide data that could help other scientists uncover the other factors of disease risk in people.

According to Dr. Nicholas Tatonetti, a biomedical informatics assistant professor at Columbia University, this study should not cause people to be overly nervous. Even though there is indeed a relationship between disease risk and birth month, there are other factors involved that have to be considered as well, including diet, exercise, and overall lifestyle.